Fired dating subordinate

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Also, you should never conduct any business related to your second job while working for the first employer, which includes phone calls, e-mails, and use of your primary employer's supplies or business contacts.Some companies concerned about sexual harassment have instituted strict "anti-nepotism" or dating policies which seek to prevent workers from dating certain or all coworkers.So if the reason for your termination is not illegal under the laws of your state, then yes, your employer can fire you for what you do on your own time, outside of work. A new trend is increasingly taking hold, where companies looking to reduce their health care costs have established not just a "no smoking" policy, but a "no smokers" policy.These companies not only refuse to hire smokers, but some are even taking the drastic step of terminating current employees who smoke.If, however, they say no, then you will have to make a decision about whether you can continue in your current employment, which is always easier to make before you are terminated for violating company policy.If your company does not have a moonlighting policy, then it may not be a problem for you to have a second job, but to be safe, you might want to consult a supervisor or your company's HR department.Even if you were not employed at will, violating your employer's policy would be sufficient "just cause" grounds for termination or discipline.(However, if you live in a state with a law restricting an employer's ability to fire you for "lawful conduct outside of work," that law might offer some protection.

Even if you have a non-work related website that you don't access from your office, employers can fire you if they feel the content on your personal site or blog is offensive to them or to potential clients, or reflects badly on the company.In some states, if you write about political matters, you may have protection under laws that make it illegal to discriminate against you for engaging in political activity.A handful of states have laws restricting an employer's ability to fire you for "lawful conduct outside of work," which might offer some protection.For more information on these laws, see our site's page on political activity retaliation.If you're whistleblowing--reporting the employer's unlawful conduct--you may have some protection if you've reported it to a government agency first.

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